Blog Archives

*Review* Think Like A Man – LOVED IT!?!

    I attended the press screening of Think Like A Man, the anticipated film adaptation of Steve Harvey’s bestselling novel Act Like A Lady, Think Like A Man.

Now, I struggled to finish the book years ago as I found it sexist and wasn’t interested in Steve Harvey telling ME what to do in ANY of my relationships. So I was a cynic all day before the screening thinking it was going to be some simple foolery.

How wrong was I?! I LOVED the film? No. Really. I LUV-HED. The. Film?!

Starring Taraji P. Henson, Gabrielle Union, Kevin Hart, Jerry Ferrera, Meagan Good, Michael Ealy (YUM), Romany Malco, Terrance J. and Gary Owen, this was a romantic comedy home run.

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*Review* “Hunger Games”: Bra-Vo.

  I had never heard of “Katniss Everdeen” before the pop culture marketing machine  cranked up for Hunger Games. Another young adult genre of best-selling book-turned-blockbuster-film was set for a spring release, but after skipping the Harry Potter craze (never seen a second of those Wizards- missmewiththat), and bored to tears by Bella & Jacob (UGH), I was honestly intrigued by HG previews. So, last Friday afternoon during an IMAX matinee, I treated myself to what everyone would surely be talking about all month long. GLAD I did.

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New Short Film Explores Lack of Fathers In Black Community

The current statistic for Black children born out of wedlock is 70%. Current statistic for Black children raised without a father in the home/in their lives is 64%. Producers/directors Squeaky Moore and Ashley Shante have created a short film called “Father’s Day” that focuses on the 64%, in hopes to explore and spark discussion on this crucial issue in our communities. Raising promotional funds through IndieGoGo, it should hit film festivals this fall. View the trailer:

Film synopsis: Cori’s father walked out on her and her mother when she was very young.  Years later, while studying Psychology in college a professor assigns her final paper assignment to write about her relationship with her father. Cori is then forced to confront her mother about the elephant in the room, her absentee father.

For several decades the Black community has watched the numbers increase, the effects of which can be seen in interpersonal relationships and self-esteem,  The film doesn’t offer any solutions, but surely sheds a critical light on this major issue. “Because fatherlessness has become the norm, does not mean, by any means, make it right. A father to a child is a necessity not a privilege.” – Squeaky Moore & Ashley Shante

Learn more about the film’s progress, cast, and screenings HERE. Thoughts?

Peace,

Dawnavette

Must See Movie:The Adjustment Bureau

The Adjustment Bureau

The Adjustment Bureau

 Last night I attended a preview screening of the Universal release, The Adjustment Bureau starring Matt Damon, Anthony Mackie, and Emily Blunt. Sponsored by Liquid Soul Media, audiences crowded Atlanta’s Regal’s Atlantic Station location to view the thriller that questions fate vs. free will. A thrilling twist on the ultimate love story,

Damon plays a young politician on the road to success, until a chance meeting with the love of his life (Blunt) makes him stop at nothing for true love. Makie plays a key member of the Adjustment Bureau that grapples with intervening with fate to support free will. Fast-paced with great special effects, the film questions morality, and the power or choices we have in the midst of living a life pre-destined. Or is it?

Post film was a Q &A session with director George Nolfi, star Anthony Mackie, and Bishop Paul S. Morton. The director emphasized that the film was not intended as a faith-based film, but always designed to question our roles as free agents. Cleverly acted, written, and directed (directorial debut), we throughly enjoyed.  Thanks so much to everyone at Liquid Soul Media for great seats and popcorn! Everyone go support the film on March 4, 2011 guaranteed great time!    Rating:  B+  

Peace,

Dawnavette